design patterns

Consuming message queues using .net core background workers – part 2: background workers

In the previous article of this series we talked a bit about Message Queues. This time instead I’ll be introducing Background Workers. Just to recap, Message Queues can be used to handle asynchronous communication between services, improving resiliency and scalability. Now, suppose you have an API for handling blog posts and tags. Every post can […]

Consuming message queues using .net core background workers – part 1: message queues

In this series we’ll talk a bit about message queues with RabbitMQ and how to integrate it in a C# WebAPI application using Background Workers. It’s hard sometimes to come up with a decent title. In this case I had to sit back and take some time to decide. I had a semi-clear idea of […]

Handling Authentication and Authorization in Microservices – Part 2

In the previous post we saw a way for handling authentication using an API Gateway and an Identity Provider. Just to refresh the concept, here’s the basic diagram: The Client will call the API Gateway, which will ask the Identity Provider to (ehm) provide the user details. The Client will get redirected to an external […]

Using Decorators to handle cross-cutting concerns — Part 2 : a practical example

In my previous article I discussed a bit about how to use the Decorator pattern to implement cross-cutting concerns and reduce clutter in your codebase. Today it’s going to be a bit more practical: we’ll be looking at a small demo I published on Github that makes use of Decorators as well as some other interesting things […]

Using Decorators to handle cross-cutting concerns

This time I’ll be writing about a very simple but powerful technique to reduce boiler-plate caused by cross-cutting concerns. In this post we’ll explore a simple way to encapsulate them in reusable components using the Decorator pattern.

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